Screaming Young Adult // Dreaming the Bear Review

Signed books are always cool. I recently received a signed copy of Dreaming the Bear for my birthday and although I’m still struggling to find the balance between young adult and more adult novels, I did enjoy this book.

This book in particular screams young adult. The main character is your typical relatable teen to an extent, but due to a respiratory illness is very weak and confined in some ways both mentally and physically, until she accidentally stumbles across an injured bear- with whom she finds refuge and comfort. After this incident they share a bond and a connection which brings with it many obstacles and difficulties in a National Park prejudiced against these bears due to their violence.

It’s an original concept for a young adult novel. Although friendship is tackled in many books for teenagers it was interesting to explore the relationship between us and animals, especially when there are more complications due to the language barrier and any prejudices others have. Although it was mainly family orientated, of course it wouldn’t be complete without a love interest, and it was inevitable that something would happen between our stereotypically female protagonist and this mysterious yet somehow reserved boy, who was a friend of her older brother.

For me, the novel seemed to be paced in bursts until the climax. For the most part it was quite cliché, apart from the original concept and her illness, and the illness gave us an easy way to sympathise with her and excuse her for her bad attitude. Sometimes things fell into place too easily: for example she always seemed to have money and food for the bear and themselves during the storm.

However, we can’t ignore the startling climax. It suddenly gets very real and we are almost sent crashing back down to earth as our beloved problematic-yet-loveable protagonist is faced with the consequences of her actions, resulting in her having to kill the bear she worked so hard to care for. I would be lying if I said I was expecting it, and although it was quite heart wrenching to read it was almost refreshing to see her learn from her mistakes, even though she obviously meant well. It seemed like she got away with a lot during the story and I’m glad us readers could extract a moral from it: that actions have consequences, and you have to face up to them.

Overall: an enjoyable concept, definitely for teenagers, and a very lighthearted easy read.

PS: I’m 3 books behind schedule on my reading challenge. I have 5 books left to read before the end of the year. Help.

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