The Costa Rica Diaries: Expectations

I’m writing this in the comfort of my favourite armchair, my Mum is on the sofa about a couple of metres away from me, I’ve had a couple of cups of coffee and a curry is on the way.

Not to say that I won’t have any of these things at all this time tomorrow, but the change in environment will definitely not be what I’m used to. This time tomorrow I’m going to be in Costa Rica.

This is a big deal for me. Firstly, because I’ve never ventured outside of Europe. Secondly, because my parents will be stuck on the other side of the world. Thirdly, because this time last year I was in a completely different place mentally.

It’s going to be fun. I’m hoping to grow as a person, I’m ready to embrace the culture and the lifestyle, but it’s going to be a challenge.

But yes, I have nothing to expect, nothing to assume, and everything to learn.

How Power must equate to violence // The Power Review

I finished reading The Power last night, and oh my sweet lord riding a bike into the sunset this was a R I D E.  A good ride, and a ride I would recommend to a friend, but nonetheless a wild one.

This book, by Naomi Alderman, a woman who teaches in the university my best friend attends, explores a world in which women suddenly develop a genetic mutation which gives them the power to control electricity. This suddenly gives them the ability to overpower men, after centuries of patriarchy and specific gender roles. What starts off as a confusing novelty escalates into war and destruction, and in this story we follow several protagonists as they try and navigate their way through this new world.

These characters give us very diverse perspectives of this situation the world is suddenly thrusted into. There is the religious aspect of it, as Allie discovers the healing process and the community it can provide. There are also opportunities to exploit it, as Tunde dedicates his life to recording what will be a dramatic historical era. Furthermore, there is the aspect of power, of course, as Roxy develops an unstoppable strength and learns how to enhance this new power further. Finally, there’s the political side to it, as Margot attempts to being together a shattered society in a world that is being divided by gender in a way that no one has ever seen. What makes me sad is that any new power always seems to lead to violence in the end.

What I found interesting was my reaction. What shocked me upon reflection was the fact that when the women became sadistic, prejudiced and downright barbaric towards men (in ways that makes me shudder to describe), it made me very uncomfortable. The shocking thing is if this was inverted I would be nowhere near as surprised. Attacks against women are nowhere near as shocking anymore, and I’m sure I’m not the only one who reads yet another rape story on twitter with a sigh, rather than a gasp. This should not become second nature, this should not become commonplace. In women or men. Neither universe, this fictional one or our reality, is right. In an ideal world, RESPECT WOULD BE COMMONPLACE.

What gives a man the right to have power over a woman because he is physically stronger? What gives a woman the right to have power over a man just because she can? Regardless of gender, if one is violated in this way they become a victim, regardless of gender. There should be no loopholes, or exceptions, or excuses. People cannot assume they can dominate or control another person without their consent. Sure, we live in a world where people are unlikely to develop supernatural powers (or if we can, hover-boards should be a thing- like the sort I used to read in ‘futuristic’ books as a kid in the 00s), but if anyone thinks they have the power to manipulate another person, then they need to take a long hard look at themselves.

This book made me realise a lot of things. This, along with a gripping and intriguing plot, makes me want to recommend it to anyone with an eye for a dystopian thriller who is looking for something a little more eye opening.

Viva la revolución… again // Glass Sword Review

What is it with young adult novels and the need for a full on revolution?

Aaaaaaages ago I got around to reading the sequel to Red Queen, a novel which I loved, which is called Glass Sword. This book continues to follow the story of Mare, a teenager who doesn’t fit into society due to being brought up in a Red family of poverty whilst possessing magical powers that were originally only seen in the other class, the Silvers.

I loved the book, don’t get me wrong. I’m all for a cheeky bit of romance and magic and all the wonders that young adult books continue to provide. However, I couldn’t help but compare this sequel to the sequel of The Hunger Games: Catching Fire. So many young adult books have a revolution against the class system that is causing more issues than the more “perfect” parts of the society don’t want to admit. There always seems to be a corrupted government/ruler, and I suppose that could be seen as a good thing because it will make young people more aware of the political world that they can actively participate in once they’ve hit the age of 18, but the repetitive ideas takes away the poignancy of it.

Another thing that I always see in YA novels is the romance. More specifically: love triangles. Sure, it gives fans the chance to make their own interpretations based on who they prefer the protagonist to be with, but there’s always an obvious lover and then a long term best friend who will never fit into the mould (Although I was always team Gale in The Hunger Games to be honest). I believe it was poignant enough that Kilorn in this series was her best friend through everything, and his role was important and it didn’t need to be tarnished by feelings for her. On the other hand, THANK GOODNESS, it did not overshadow the overall plot.

It’s full of development, it’s progressive but leaves room for a climactic final novel, and Victoria Aveyard seems to set out to prove that Mare can’t do everything, and the powerful ending emphasises this.

Overall: I still very much enjoy this series, I’m planning on reading the third book soon, and although the repetition of ideas across young adult novels is frustrating, I haven’t been put off the genre just yet.

More broken than usual, but we’ll roll with it // Alicia Review

Naturally, because I haven’t had the chance to read lately, I’ve been sitting around this weekend doing nothing but read. Fuelled with caffeine and alcohol, I finally finished Alicia yesterday, a novel written by a friend of a university pal: D J Baldock.

This book is no normal superhero novel, and it’s also not set in a normal dystopian universe. Alicia, the eponymous protagonist, is a rogue and powerful woman who is hell-bent on revenge against the man who has forced her into a life of ruin and destruction. She meets a squeaky-clean superhero (Violet) who turns out to be her opposite with her own share of darkness. However, the wrath that follows extends beyond her personal vendettas and she must team up with fellow superheroes who are also fighting against this series of allegedly “coincidental” events, but of course, there’s more to it than just that. Somehow, he successfully combines powerful young women fresh out of their teen years with a perilous society without making it cliché, which is a feat that very much impressed me after reading many a predictable storyline over the years.

However, despite the whole young guns against the world thing going on, there is a dark side to this plot that makes it much more adult, and the very distinct lack of sugar-coating makes it refreshing (which completely juxtaposes the vibe of the story but I’m sure you’d know what I mean). Another thing to note is the language. As someone who has expanded their vocabulary through books, the complexity of the words used adds a flair to what could be just an ordinary sci-fi novel. Although it does seem like the author has swallowed a thesaurus, it’s nice to see some more sophisticated language for a change.

Another cool aspect is the realism. Every character is flawed to the point that you wouldn’t instantly gravitate to Alicia, Violet, Bethany, or any of the other characters, superhero or untempered (a rogue human with supernatural powers). Alicia is repeatedly described as broken to the point where you could lose faith in her, but she proves to be vital, and no one is safe from the whims of the author’s pen- although not to the extent of George R. R. Martin.

This book is underrated, and is available on Amazon, so if you’re looking for a superhero sci-fi novel with a bit more brutality and some unconventional twists, you’re welcome. 

Link to the paperback and kindle: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Alicia-Ascendant-Untempered-D-Baldock/dp/0993323707/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1491773629&sr=1-1&keywords=9780993323706

PS: This is the first of a series! I’m actually excited to read the next novel despite avoiding book series for a while due to life getting in the way. I need to stop rambling in the postscript- it must be time for a beer.