How Power must equate to violence // The Power Review

I finished reading The Power last night, and oh my sweet lord riding a bike into the sunset this was a R I D E.  A good ride, and a ride I would recommend to a friend, but nonetheless a wild one.

This book, by Naomi Alderman, a woman who teaches in the university my best friend attends, explores a world in which women suddenly develop a genetic mutation which gives them the power to control electricity. This suddenly gives them the ability to overpower men, after centuries of patriarchy and specific gender roles. What starts off as a confusing novelty escalates into war and destruction, and in this story we follow several protagonists as they try and navigate their way through this new world.

These characters give us very diverse perspectives of this situation the world is suddenly thrusted into. There is the religious aspect of it, as Allie discovers the healing process and the community it can provide. There are also opportunities to exploit it, as Tunde dedicates his life to recording what will be a dramatic historical era. Furthermore, there is the aspect of power, of course, as Roxy develops an unstoppable strength and learns how to enhance this new power further. Finally, there’s the political side to it, as Margot attempts to being together a shattered society in a world that is being divided by gender in a way that no one has ever seen. What makes me sad is that any new power always seems to lead to violence in the end.

What I found interesting was my reaction. What shocked me upon reflection was the fact that when the women became sadistic, prejudiced and downright barbaric towards men (in ways that makes me shudder to describe), it made me very uncomfortable. The shocking thing is if this was inverted I would be nowhere near as surprised. Attacks against women are nowhere near as shocking anymore, and I’m sure I’m not the only one who reads yet another rape story on twitter with a sigh, rather than a gasp. This should not become second nature, this should not become commonplace. In women or men. Neither universe, this fictional one or our reality, is right. In an ideal world, RESPECT WOULD BE COMMONPLACE.

What gives a man the right to have power over a woman because he is physically stronger? What gives a woman the right to have power over a man just because she can? Regardless of gender, if one is violated in this way they become a victim, regardless of gender. There should be no loopholes, or exceptions, or excuses. People cannot assume they can dominate or control another person without their consent. Sure, we live in a world where people are unlikely to develop supernatural powers (or if we can, hover-boards should be a thing- like the sort I used to read in ‘futuristic’ books as a kid in the 00s), but if anyone thinks they have the power to manipulate another person, then they need to take a long hard look at themselves.

This book made me realise a lot of things. This, along with a gripping and intriguing plot, makes me want to recommend it to anyone with an eye for a dystopian thriller who is looking for something a little more eye opening.

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